July 30, 2010

Weekly Roundup: World’s most valuable brands, R.I.P. phone calls and ‘Men are from Hulu, Women are from Facebook’

Posted by: in North America

-Forbes released its Most  Valuable Brands ranking, and The Guardian published its 2010 MediaGuardian 100. (See our Q&A with nominee No. 14, Mark Rock.)

-Akash Kapur considers the paradox of modernity in India—it’s embracing 21st-century lifestyles while holding on to “antiquated norms”—in The New York Times.

-The Economist looks at what’s next for China in the wake of its labor unrest.

-The Economist Intelligence Unit proposes the “CIVETS” (Colombia, Indonesia, Vietnam, Egypt, Turkey and South Africa) as a “new tier of countries beyond the BRICs”—emerging markets poised for healthy growth.

-The American economy is “schizophrenic,” says BusinessWeek in “The New Abnormal”: “Americans are broke and depressed—and also swilling $3 lattes and waiting in line for iPhones.”

-Hispanics in the U.S. “exemplify our idealized concept of 1950s America,” says Ad Age, which released a new report, 2010 Hispanic America.

-Harvard Business Review’s Michael Schrage considers “The Hireless Recovery” in which companies are doing more with fewer people, including replacing humans with automated systems.

-In “The Web Means the End of Forgetting,” The New York Times Magazine considers the ramifications of “a world where the Internet records everything and forgets nothing.”

-“Clive Thompson on the Death of the Phone Call,” in Wired.

-comScore’s “Women on the Web: How Women are Shaping the Internet,” a global report on the topic, finds that “Men Are From Hulu, Women Are From Facebook,” as MediaPost puts it.

-Ad Age reports on a Forrester finding that most Americans are “still in the dark” about location-based apps.

-The WikiLeaks-enabled publication of classified U.S. military documents “will be seen as a milestone in the new news ecosystem,” says TheAtlantic.com’s Alexis Madrigal. And NYU journalism professor Jay Rosen sees WikiLeaks as the first “stateless news organization.”

-“Will Zynga Become the Google of Games?” asks The New York Times in a look at “the hottest start-up to emerge from Silicon Valley since Twitter.”

-Wired interviews Flickr co-founder Caterina Fake on her latest venture, Hunch, a social search service that seeks to improve online recommendations by gathering data on users’ interests and tastes.

-The New York Times looks at how technology is helping people monitor their elderly parents, a development that ties into one of our 10 Trends for 2010, Retooling for an Aging World.

-Discovery News questions whether electric cars are really better for the environment.

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