December 17, 2010

Weekly Roundup: ‘Hope is on the move,’ the battle over smart cities and China’s ‘ant tribes’

Posted by: in North America

-“Hope is on the move,” reports The Economist. Optimism no longer defines Western culture, with 87 percent of Chinese saying their country is moving in the right direction, vs. just 31 percent of Britons. We looked at hope-fueled vs. fear-fueled markets in an AnxietyIndex Quarterly last year. (Click here to download.)

-McKinsey Quarterly looks at how “the growth of emerging markets will strain global finance.”

-Examining The Future of Cities, Information, and Inclusion, a 10-year forecast map from The Institute for the Future, Fast Company asks, “Who will own the brains of smart cities—citizens or corporations?”

-Western drug corporations are looking to gain in Asia by developing drugs for diseases that are more common there, reports The Wall Street Journal.

-The Pew Global Attitudes Project explores social networking use around the world, as well as other technology-adoption trends.

-Nielsen released a study on mobile phone ownership among youth around the world. Fast Company highlights two tidbits: Italy has the highest smartphone penetration among youth, and smartphone users skew male, except in the U.S.

-eMarketer forecasts that tablet sales will exceed 81 million units worldwide in 2012.

-Ad Age looks at how Latin American entrepreneurs have localized the Groupon model for “consumers who don’t like to plan ahead.”

-Smartphone-equipped shoppers represent “a revolution in retailing” that’s “striking fear into retailers,” says The Wall Street Journal.

-BusinessWeek looks at Daimler’s car2go service and the trend toward car sharing over owning. And Paris’ mayor announces details of a city-wide electric-car-sharing program to debut next August.

-In China, a steep rise in college graduates is outpacing the supply of good professional jobs, leading to an “ant tribe” of educated young job seekers, reports The New York Times. The Times also examines how the recession has prompted a rise in entrepreneurship among young American graduates.

-The Pew Research Center examines how different generational cohorts access and use the Internet; certain activities, like seeking health information and purchasing products, are becoming “more uniformly popular across all age groups.”

-How are Americans dividing up their media time? TechCrunch parses a recent eMarketer report and finds that adults spend as much time on mobile devices as they do reading print magazines and newspapers. And a Forrester survey finds the average American is spending as much time online as watching TV.

-ReadWriteWeb surveyed the Top 10 Internet of Things developments of 2010.

-Everything that mattered in 2010: The New York Times published its annual list of the Year in Ideas. Facebook released its top status trends of the year, Twitter published its year in review lists, and YouTube spotlighted the most watched videos of the year. Contagious rounded up “vital trends, campaigns and technologies from the past year.”

-We recently released our sixth annual forecast of key trends that will shape or significantly impact consumer behavior in the year ahead. To see what’s on tap for 2011, read more about the report here or watch a two-minute teaser video that gives a quick rundown of our forecast.

1 Response to "Weekly Roundup: ‘Hope is on the move,’ the battle over smart cities and China’s ‘ant tribes’"

1 | Taciana

January 11th, 2011 at 10:58 am

Avatar

Great post. Thank you. I’ll keep coming back for your weekly roundups! =)

Comment Form

SIGN UP FOR OUR WEEKLY EMAIL NEWSLETTER:

10 Years of 10 Trends

The Future 100

Things to Watch

  • Bloom
    June 29, 2015 | 11:32 am

    Bloom

    A new service called Bloom aims to bridge the generation gap using stripped-down technology. The service includes a minimal tablet display interface that seniors can place in a chosen room to receive updates from family, as well as a smart wristband that activates the display automatically when users approach it. Other family members who’ve downloaded Bloom can share photos and videos to their loved one’s stream using their mobile devices.

    Continue reading “Bloom” »

  • SecondHands
    June 25, 2015 | 12:02 pm

    SecondHands Small

    British online supermarket Ocado has announced its SecondHands program: a five-year project aiming to create an autonomous robotic warehouse employee. An example of our “Cognitive Technology” trend in this year’s Future 100 report, the project could revolutionize the way factories handle repairs, logistics and more, but comes with its share of challenges. Continue reading “SecondHands” »

  • Offices for the young at heart
    June 23, 2015 | 5:59 pm

    LegoModern offices, especially in the tech sector, have become known as adult playgrounds that foster creativity and collaboration. The image of millennials playing ping pong at work is its own meme in the age of The Social Network. And there’s a prevailing idea that the younger the workforce, the more cutting edge and productive the company.

    Continue reading “Offices for the young at heart” »

  • Transparency ratings
    June 22, 2015 | 4:23 pm

    Data

    The fight for digital privacy continues to gain momentum two years after Edward Snowden’s dramatic disclosures. But while most technology companies have made progress in protecting consumer data, some are lagging behind, according to the latest report from the Electronic Frontier FoundationContinue reading “Transparency ratings” »

  • Taste rewind
    June 19, 2015 | 5:29 pm

    Britney_Small

    Spotify’s new Taste Rewind feature is a music lover’s time machine. It’s a tool designed to help listeners discover “what you’d be jammin’ out to if you were born during a different decade.”

    Taste Rewind asks you to choose three of your favorite contemporary artists, then creates a personalized playlist representing each decade from the ‘60s on. Targeting a younger user base, the app plays on Millennials’ tendency to be nostalgic even about eras they never experienced. Continue reading “Taste rewind” »

  • Menswear’s delicate side
    June 17, 2015 | 5:13 pm

    DelicateMenswear

    Recent years have seen a surge in gender-neutral fashion, from luxury heavyweights such as Prada to cult favorite Hood By Air. But this week at London Collections Men, designers are offering a new twist: lace, ruffles and velvet, constructed in distinctly masculine shapes. Continue reading “Menswear’s delicate side” »

  • Co-working gets domestic
    June 16, 2015 | 5:28 pm

    WeWork

    Popular co-working space WeWork will soon launch WeLive—a project that combines WeWork’s famously fun work spaces with dorm-style micro apartments. A press release for WeLive describes the buildings as “neighborhoods,” featuring 200+ apartments with shared commercial-grade kitchens and community spaces, along with several floors of office space. Continue reading “Co-working gets domestic” »

  • Native American dining
    June 11, 2015 | 1:56 pm

    native-american-food-truck-small

    Although it’s easy to sample the cuisines of Ethiopia or Vietnam in most major US cities, Native American restaurants are practically nonexistent. However, with the rise of locavore movements and interest in pre-industrial foods from the likes of the paleo crowd, the indigenous cuisines of the United States could be ready to claim their rightful place in today’s food culture. Continue reading “Native American dining” »

  • Time-travel media
    June 8, 2015 | 5:13 pm

    Future Chronicles

    The Future Chronicles, currently raising money on Kickstarter, bills itself as the “first magazine ever that travels through time.” Created by German agency Hyperraum, the magazine aims to explore both the past and the future through creative narration and design.

    Continue reading “Time-travel media” »

  • Invisible wearables
    June 2, 2015 | 4:12 pm

    Project Jacquard

    A new initiative announced at Google’s annual developers conference is making waves in the wearable tech world. Project Jacquard, launched in collaboration with Levi’s, makes touch interfaces more wearable than ever by weaving them directly into traditional textiles. This high-tech fabric is made of conductive thread that can respond to touch signals like swipes and taps, and sync up with a smartphone to execute basic functions. Digiday calls the innovation “Google Glass for your ass.”

    Continue reading “Invisible wearables” »

  • RSSArchive for Things to Watch »