January 7, 2011

Weekly Roundup: The new media landscape, men’s skin care in China and science is big in Brazil

Posted by: in North America

Note to readers: Due to office closures over Christmas and New Year’s, this roundup covers our must-read stories for the past two weeks.

-Everything CES 2011: Follow the Consumer Electronics Show on Ad Geek, a blog from JWT’s Kyle Monson. Wired’s Gadget Lab spotlights their top stories; for shorter attention spans, there’s a video wrapup. So-called smart TVs, which can run apps, are this year’s theme for television manufacturers, reports The Wall Street Journal. BusinessWeek suggests tablets are the new PCs.

-The year ahead in media: Today’s media landscape “looks profoundly altered and punished,” observes The New York Times, while The Wall Street Journal says digital technologies have “laid waste to traditional media.” Both forecast the changes that 2011 will bring.

-An HSBC senior economist on “What Awaits European Business in 2011,” in BusinessWeek.

-Mashable looks at five major trends we’ll see from tech startups in 2011, including private location services and the rise of object tagging. Business Insider lists 25 New York-based startups to watch (among them: Solve Media, pioneer of CAPTCHA advertising).

-Brazil is “an emerging power” in scientific research, says The Economist, and looking to become “a hot destination for seekers of science.”

-Wired looks at the newest wave of artificial intelligence machines, “built to accomplish specific tasks in ways that people never could.”

-The Atlantic takes a graphic approach to show how the recession “upended” life in the U.S.

-Films are starting to reflect the recession’s impact on the middle class, says The New York Times’ A.O. Scott, with more class consciousness onscreen.

-A Pew Internet survey finds that 65 percent of U.S. Internet users have paid to access online content. Music and software were most popular, followed by apps and games.

-“2010 was a very bad year for trying to sell music,” says NPR, which outlines some music-sales trends based on Nielsen SoundScan numbers.

-Now that “the first serious contenders for a mass-scale electric car are on the road,” a BusinessWeek cover story asks, “will they change the world?”

-Ad Age examines Best Buy’s steps into content creation as the company rolls out a multichannel network that includes in-store programming and an online magazine.

-The Economist looks at how “Britain’s embattled newspapers are leading the world in innovation” via several divergent strategies.

-Clive Thompson argues that “tweets and texts nurture in-depth analysis” in Wired.

-Ad Age’s Simon Dumenco outlines how Twitter culture shifted in 2010, becoming a source of entertainment in itself.

-Japanese Tweeters sent a record-breaking 6,939 tweets per second while ringing in the New Year.

-In Pakistan, inflation is pushing more young, poor women to get service-sector jobs, “pitting their religious and cultural traditions against economic desperation,” say The New York Times.

-Almost 7 in 10 Mexicans are overweight/obese, the highest percentage in the world, and CNN takes a look at the issue.

-A market for men’s skin care products blossoms in China.

-Facebook gains popularity among Kenyan, Nigerian and South African youth.

-The “culture of play” is fading for American kids, reports The New York Times, but a movement to restore playtime is gaining momentum.

-The Guardian takes a look at one family’s six-month de-teching stint.

-The New York Times’ Nicholas Kristof argues it’s more important for American kids to learn Spanish than Chinese.

-NPR examines the rise of regional distilleries that craft small-batch spirits for discerning drinkers.

-The fastest-growing Web startups of the last three years—Gilt Groupe, Zynga and Groupon—have women as their core audience; Business Insider explores what this means for the Internet.

-Check out our annual 100 Things to Watch in 2011 list, a compilation that in part reflects broader shifts we’ve been tracking over the past few years, along with a little bit about what makes each item worth watching.

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