May 18, 2011

Tagging platforms like Stipple enable ‘shopping from a picture’

Posted by: in North America

Last week Facebook added the ability to tag photos with brand, product and people Pages (example photos show a woman holding a Coke and fans with Kanye West). This opens up a rich array of opportunities for brands to gain awareness outside their owned presence on Facebook—indeed, photo tags may be “the new Likes.” Meanwhile, several startups are focusing on enabling the tagging of content within images. We’ve spotlighted Emma Active, and there’s also Pixazza and ThingLink. Now Stipple has introduced tools that transform images across the Web into pieces of interactive content for photo rights holders, publishers, consumers and brands. For the latter, its Pipeline product helps Web surfers “easily shop from a picture.” Viewers hover their mouse over a product in an image to see product info and an option to shop for the item online or add it to a “want list.” “This platform has the potential to be massive,” notes Tech Crunch.

For brands, a product like Stipple delivers advertising impressions that carry a strong level of consumer intent—proactively hovering over a product means the viewer wants to know more. And brands can integrate with an existing story rather than attempting to pull consumers away from the one in which they’re already engaged. CPG and fashion brands especially could easily find opportunities to get in front of their target audiences with photo-tagging products. A tool like Stipple is a great way for brands to unshackle their e-commerce shopping carts from their owned properties and push them down the aisles of the Web.

Photo Credits: http://stippleit.com/; http://www.facebook.com/notes

1 Response to "Tagging platforms like Stipple enable ‘shopping from a picture’"

1 | David Rosenberg

May 18th, 2011 at 3:59 pm

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Great post. Will be interesting to understand who will own this ‘virtual’ real estate.

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