June 24, 2011

Weeky Roundup: Disappearing brands, the era of hyperspecialization, the end of dot-com

Posted by: in North America

-Merrill Lynch and Capgemini’s annual World Wealth Report provides “the latest sign that the wealthy have weathered the downturn far better than other groups,” reports The Financial Times. Asia now has more millionaires than Europe, a much younger cohort than in the West, says The Wall Street Journal.

-Harvard Business Review explores the new era of hyperspecialization in the work world.

-Anthony Weiner as a sign of the times: The New York Times explores how the Internet is “upending anonymity” and making “the public sphere more public than ever before,” and The Economist looks at “the costs of inhabiting a digital reality.”

-Time reports on a report that suggests a job recovery in the U.S. could be at least a decade away for many cities.

-In a “significant shift,” homeownership is becoming “a fading dream” for many young adults in the U.K., reports The New York Times.

-New U.S. demographic data confirms “a changing social order, one in which racial and ethnic minorities will become the U.S. majority by midcentury,” reports the AP. And The Economist looks at Census data on the growing “marriage gap” between wealthier/better educated Americans and the rest.

-With wages rising across the nation, Time reports on “The End of Cheap Labor in China.”

-The development of high-speed rail systems is accelerating China’s growth, reports The New York Times.

-Sears and Nokia are among 24/7 Wall St.’s Ten Brands That Will Disappear in 2012 (plus, a look at the status of the brands on their 2010 list).

-“The Future According to Eric Schmidt”: At Cannes, Google’s chairman shares some thoughts on near-term innovations.

-Cloud-based video games are threatening the console industry, and Bloomberg Businessweek says its future looks bleak.

-“The dot-com era is over. Welcome to the dot-anything age,” says The Wall Street Journal, as new rules are approved on top-level domain names.

-ReadWriteWeb takes a look at a new crop of social networks that emphasize location over friends.

-Ad Age covers the boom in social networks for kids, and why they’re mostly ad-free zones.

-“Fashion is morphing into a two-way dialogue,” reports Mashable, as designers connect online with shoppers.

-ReadWriteWeb reports that iPhone app downloads in Asia have jumped over the past six months (with China now the No. 2 market), but overall revenue is lagging, according to a report by Distimo.

-Americans have gotten more industrious on weekends, especially women, reports USA Today.

-More automakers are setting up (research) shop in Silicon Valley, says Fast Company.

-The Wall Street Journal surveys a colorful new trend: “vanity barcodes.”

-Will there be a flight from suburban to city homes as Boomers downsize? NPR examines another challenge for the U.S. housing market.

-Adweek reports on the rise of online reputation defenders for brands.

-Variety examines how YouTube is evolving, with the site “looking to Hollywood to help reposition itself as a home for programming of a higher pedigree.”

-Intelligent Life bemoans the state of Hollywood films.

-The world’s oceans are “at high risk for entering a phase of extinction of marine species unprecedented in human history,” according to a new report.

-The New York Times looks at the boom in home beer brewing.

No Responses to "Weeky Roundup: Disappearing brands, the era of hyperspecialization, the end of dot-com"

Comment Form

SIGN UP FOR OUR WEEKLY EMAIL NEWSLETTER:

10 Years of 10 Trends

The Future 100

Things to Watch