July 1, 2011

Weekly Roundup: Pessimistic Americans, distrustful Brits and men in skirts

Posted by: in North America

-Fast Company reports on the Union of Concerned Scientists’ Climate Hot Map, which details the planet’s economic challenges as climate change impacts ecosystems.

-Time reports on the U.S. Census Bureau’s International Data Base population forecast, which puts India as bigger than China by 2025 and sees major declines for Japan and Russia.

-America’s widening income gap “could reshape marketing strategies this year, and for years to come,” writes Ad Age, as the wealthy grow more inclined to spend and everyone else cuts back.

-“Irking drivers is urban policy” across Europe, reports The New York Times, which covers the rise of tactics designed to make car use less appealing.

-America is in the midst of “one of its longest sustained periods of unhappiness and pessimism ever,” according to a Time/Aspen Ideas Festival study that looks at how the U.S. is faring 10 years after 9/11.

-The New York Times looks at why recent college graduates are opting for green jobs.

– “Kinect Hackers Are Changing the Future of Robotics,” says Wired, since DIYers now have the tools to create innovations that once could have come only from R&D labs.

-The recent Cannes Lions festival spotlighted how advertising is increasingly converging with entertainment and technology, reports The Wall Street Journal.

-The Brain Pickings blog surveys “7 Platforms Changing the Future of Publishing.”

-Fast Company looks at a few forthcoming technologies that could help reshape health care.

-The Telegraph reports that cooperatives like John Lewis are thriving in the U.K. as trust in mainstream businesses takes a dive.

-Public libraries aren’t anomalous in the digital age, they’re just turning into Wi-Fi access points and e-book centers, says Fast Company.

-Reporting from The Cable Show, the Chicago Tribune looks at how the industry is attempting to make TV viewing more interactive and personalized. (Something Facebook talked about this week too.)

-The New York Times looks at how companies like Klout and Twitter Grader rate online influencers and how brands are using the data—looks like our Personal CPM trend from several years back is bubbling up.

-The U.K.’s NewMediaAge reports on a survey that examined consumer attitudes toward Facebook commerce.

-Ad Age spotlights notable findings from a new survey of Millennial shopping habits.

-While more online-video viewing is taking place during primetime, this isn’t taking audiences away from primetime TV, according to Digiday’s report on a Yahoo study of online video habits.

-Google unveiled its latest foray into social. But Forrester’s Josh Bernoff advises that marketers “can safely ignore” Google+ for the short term, as it won’t “dent Facebook anytime soon.”

-Businesses of all sizes are adopting in-house social networks, according to The New York Times.

-Male models on this season’s Paris runways—some in skirts—reflected the rising idea “that hard and soft can coexist in one man’s spirit and in his wardrobe,” says The New York Times.

-Yearbooks are on the wane, with CNN Money reporting they’re victims of school budget cuts, but e-versions are on the rise.

1 Response to "Weekly Roundup: Pessimistic Americans, distrustful Brits and men in skirts"

1 | Tara Brown

July 7th, 2011 at 2:33 pm

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It makes sense about yearbooks going digital. The first thing many of me and my friends did when first joining Facebook was scanning and uploading all the yearbook photos from elementary and high school. Getting your yearbook signed will be interesting – will it just be a simple comment?

I liked the whole process of handing my yearbook to someone and them going off and writing something….the anticipation of what that boy I liked might write, the personalization of people’s designer signatures and cartoon drawings…

It will be interesting to see if making your mark on someone’s yearbook can be creative and personal.

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