April 27, 2012

Weekly Roundup: Social media in China, mobile money in Africa and the new relationship faux pas

Posted by: in North America

-With the ranks of Brazil’s wealthy continuing to balloon, the country will see more pressure for efficient government, says The Financial Times.

-The Economist examines the rise of e-commerce in India (one of our Things to Watch in 2012).

-For the first time decades, net migration from Mexico to the U.S. has zeroed out, according to the Pew Hispanic Center. The Guardian takes a look at why many younger Mexicans no longer see the U.S. as a land of opportunity.

-The Economist spotlights a new study that spotlights just how far ahead Africa is in terms of mobile money.

-With an advanced “mobile wallet” infrastructure, Canada is “in the lead in developing a system that could one day make cash obsolete,” reports Reuters.

-The World Bank’s new Global Financial Inclusion initiative examines why about half the global population lacks a bank account and why, as Businessweek reports.

-Nigeria continues attracting multinational investment despite recent violence in the country’s north, reports Bloomberg Businessweek.

-Yet another report warns of worse-than-expected extreme weather caused by global warming, this one from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.

-Ad Age asks whether mascots like Ronald McDonald will go the way of Joe Camel as the obesity epidemic spurs activists to target kid-focused marketing.

-MIT’s Sherry Turkle examines today’s “Flight From Conversation,” arguing that our mobile devices “are so powerful that they change not only what we do, but also who we are.”

-The Guardian takes an extensive look at “How tablets are eating the PC’s future – but might save the desktop computer.”

-Oversharing online is a new source of tension among couples, according to The New York Times.

-McKinsey Quarterly surveys China’s social media landscape.

-MIT’s Technology Review spotlights how fast-growing mobile social networks in Africa are challenging Facebook.

-GigaOM’s Matthew Ingram asks, “What if Facebook isn’t so special after all?”

-Business Insider says “Pinterest’s hype bubble has burst.”

-Mother Jones outlines the rise of “brogrammer” culture in Silicon Valley and argues it’s hurting the companies that foster it.

-The Wall Street Journal looks at how strategic pivoting has become essential for today’s young tech entrepreneurs.

-The Wall Street Journal takes a look at how men’s attitudes toward grooming have changed, with male skin care now one of the hottest corners of the beauty category.

-Who has the most plastic surgery across 25 nations? The Economist charts the data.

-Reuters looks at how U.S. apparel brands are following Europe’s fast-fashion retailers in speeding up their time to market.

-As Myanmar opens up, The New York Times examines some of the challenges of developing tourism in the country’s more remote regions.

-Wired examines a skill near to our hearts: “How to Spot the Future.”

-Our April trend report, “Gen Z: Digital in Their DNA,” provides a snapshot of the generation born after 1995, focusing on their digital habits: how they use connected devices to socialize, spend, shop and more. We also report on how their parents feel about these habits and what this means for marketers. Read about it here.

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