July 12, 2013

Two-week roundup: The primacy of images, privacy ‘jumps the shark’ and the ‘Age of Techno Anxiety’

Posted by: in North America

Find our roundups collected in magazine form on Flipboard, the iOS and Android app; download the app to view this week’s edition here: http://flip.it/GJ1IO.

Due to Independence Day office closures, this roundup covers the past two weeks.

-Writing in Harvard Business Review, Jeffrey F. Rayport argues that with traditional marketing methods increasingly ineffective, human experience is advertising’s new medium.

-In a Wall Street Journal essay, Francis Fukuyama attributes today’s political turmoil to unmet expectations among newly prosperous and educated citizens.

-After more than two years of war and turmoil, an Economist special report asks whether the Arab Spring has been a failure.

-The New York TimesNick Bilton explores how images are starting to form a new type of language in the digital realm.

-Privacy has “jumped the shark,” says New York’s Frank Rich, arguing that today’s America “prefers to be out there, prizing networking, exhibitionism, and fame more than privacy, introspection, and solitude.”

-A TechCrunch writer argues that the biggest threat to privacy is not online but in the physical world.

-The New York Times spotlights the rise of “countersurveillance fashion.”

-GigaOM makes a case for a sliding scale of privacy online.

-The Economist takes a look at the expansion of tech startups around the Arab world.

-The New York Times reports on a study that explores why Asian Internet companies aren’t succeeding on a global scale.

-With China now the biggest smartphone market, homegrown smartphone brands are challenging Apple and Samsung, reports The New York Times.

-The Atlantic discusses China’s growing problem of caring for its elderly.

-Americans are living longer but not healthier, according to The Wall Street Journal.

-The Wall Street Journal reports on the expansion of health clinics in American workplaces.

-The AP looks at the American trend toward hiring freelancers, consultants or contract workers rather than full-time employees.

-Pew studies the rise of single fathers in the U.S. The Atlantic asks what this trend means for fatherhood. (Also see our June report, “The State of Men.”)

-More evidence of our Marriage Optional trend: Projections show that by 2016, a majority of British children will be born to unwed mothers, per The Telegraph.

-Japan’s national mood is on the rise, as is interest in playing a larger role on the world stage, according to a Pew study.

-Americans are feeling less inclined to engage in international issues, according to a study from Pew.

-A Nielsen global survey finds that with rising discretionary income in many growth markets, “consumption is expanding beyond the everyday basics.”

-The Economist takes a look at how retailers are adapting to the threat posed by e-commerce giants.

-USA Today examines why some U.S. apparel brands are leaving China and “reshoring” their manufacturing.

-More men are “finding lessons in their grandfathers’ wardrobes,” says The Wall Street Journal. (See our “State of Men” report for more on “retrosexuals.”)

-With gender lines continuing to blur, The New York Times spotlights the popularity of suits tailor-made for women.

-Bloomberg takes a look at how retailers are responding to the trend toward mother-daughter clothes shopping.

-The latest edition of “Monitoring the Future,” a survey of young Americans, looks at how the Great Recession has affected attitudes among high schoolers.

-USA Today explores the long-term impact of student loan debt on Millennials’ lives.

-ABC News takes a look at a new crop of Millennial-targeted media networks.

-Today’s TV shows are bringing a big-screen sensibility to the flat screen, as the Philadelphia Inquirer reports.

-A Mashable infographic spotlights how we discover and consume music today.

-With the advent of self-driving cars, cities may start looking very different, as The New York Times reports.

-As demand for automotive apps skyrockets, The New York Times looks at the rise of a high-tech culture in Detroit.

-A New York Times news analysis explores “The End of Car Culture.”

-More hotels are looking to lure locals interested in various amenities rather than an overnight stay, reports The Wall Street Journal.

-Quartz magazine checks out the smartwatch market and outlines some trends.

-The watch industry is growing even as wristwatches become superfluous, as MarketWatch reports.

-The New York Times reports on three high-tech glasses released this year that aren’t Google-related.

-The Atlantic deconstructs the De-teching trend, the “Age of Techno Anxiety” and “the new New Naturalism.”

-The Economist explores books related to Visual Fluency (one of our 10 Trends for 2010) and the “revolution” in visualizing information.

-The New York Times takes a look at how food brands are catering to rising interest in Asian and Latin flavors among a more diverse American population.

-Ad Age reports on trends evident at this year’s Fancy Food Show in New York.

-The Economist looks at the brunch craze among Mumbai’s ultra-rich.

-Exotic berries of all shapes, colors and sizes are having their moment in the produce department, according to The Wall Street Journal.

-The Economist takes a look at how changes in coffee consumption are affecting crop farmers.

-Amid fears of milk safety in China, wet nurses are becoming more popular, according to Bloomberg Businessweek.

-British consumers are choosing butter over margarine these days, reports The Guardian.

-The AP examines “marijuana’s march toward the mainstream” in the U.S.

-Europe is adopting even stricter bans on tobacco products.

-This week we launched the JWTIntelligence iPad app, which brings our trends intelligence to life for the tablet. For more information, click here.

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