October 18, 2013

Weekly Roundup: Manly packaging, privacy-seeking Millennials and ‘man buns’

Posted by: in North America

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-“Divining the Future,” a series from The New York Times, includes reports on how far artificial intelligence has come, how media is evolving and “Asia’s Challenge to Europe.”

-Tech startups are popping up around Africa, thanks to better connectivity and rising consumption, explains Newsweek.

-The Wall Street Journal examines Mexico’s new junk food tax, an effort to contain the rise in obesity.

-As men do more grocery shopping, supermarket brands are making packaging more “manly,” explains The Wall Street Journal.

-Most American Millennials are “still not setting out on their own” and forming their own households, according to Pew research.

-Millennial travelers both spend more and complain more, according to a new Expedia study, via USA Today.

-Rather than perennially over-sharing, as conventional wisdom has it, many Millennials are very privacy-savvy, reports Slate.

-A surprising number of Millennials believe technology can be dehumanizing, but many in developing markets disagree, per a new Intel study.

-Reports that Boomers are abandoning suburbs for urban living belie the fact that most want to “age in place,” reports Forbes.

-With Google announcing that it will feature users’ posts and photos in ads, Time examines how more marketers are “trying to cash in on users’ connections.”

-The Economist reports that mobile apps are starting to reshape the taxi market in cities around the globe.

-The New York Times takes a look at how virtual-reality experiences are coming to fruition.

-As more U.S. cities track data on residents for law enforcement purposes, privacy advocates are raising alarms, says The New York Times.

-The Economist reports that a new USB PD (Power Delivery) standard next year could “change the way homes and offices use electricity.”

-Yet more research confirms that Americans are delaying retirement thanks to financial constraints, reports the AP.

-With many Americans struggling to pay bills, some are selling their hair, breast milk and eggs to raise cash, reports Bloomberg.

-A new survey examines the rise of online video viewing and the decline in TV viewing among Millennials, via Mashable.

-Adweek cites Nielsen data showing that the American TV audience is aging up, and the 18-49 cohort have largely turned away.

-Bloomberg Businessweek looks at why British imports are invading Americans’ TV screens.

-More apps and other digital services are catering to luxury customers, reports The New York Times.

-The Daily Beast spotlights a Wharton study finding that its male grads are becoming more egalitarian at home.

-Latin America is the next frontier for discount airlines, reports The Wall Street Journal.

-The BBC takes a look at the flourishing tech hub in Recife, in Brazil’s north.

-With consumers increasingly focused on their sugar intake, juices are on the decline, reports Bloomberg Businessweek.

-“Homemade Is the New Organic,” asserts The Atlantic, since “media has raised the bar for home cooking.”

-An FT columnist explores how craft breweries are challenging the big beer players.

-China is seeing the rise of imaginative restaurants that are uniquely Chinese, reports The New York Times.

-The FT takes a look at why the price of cocoa is rising.

-USA Today spotlights the rising popularity of moonshine (cited in our 2012 food-trends report).

-The Guardian investigates the popularity of “man buns” as more male celebrities sport the hairstyle.

2 Responses to "Weekly Roundup: Manly packaging, privacy-seeking Millennials and ‘man buns’"

1 | grace

October 22nd, 2013 at 11:41 am

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there’s not enough time in the world to finish reading the stuff you guys are curating.

but there’s time for a quick thank you note.

2 | grace

October 22nd, 2013 at 11:41 am

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thanks! :)

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