October 4, 2013

Weekly Roundup: Twitter’s global impact, Paleo profits and the iPosture

Posted by: in North America

Find our roundups collected in magazine form on Flipboard, the iOS and Android app; download the app to view this week’s edition here: http://flip.it/J6Fj

-A McKinsey report on “the shifting global business landscape” examines changes in where and how the world does business as emerging markets expand.

-As Twitter files an IPO, an FT special report takes a look at how people around the globe are using the service and the cultural impact it’s having.

-Ad Age highlights a study that finds older Millennials, particularly those with kids, aren’t all that different from the generations before them.

-A new report from Georgetown University explores Millennials’ delayed transition to adulthood, as The Wall Street Journal reports.

-For many college students, email is just too slow, reports The New York Times.

-The New York Times examines the endurance of store brands in supermarkets well beyond the recession.

-A Gartner reports finds that the 3D printer market has reached an “inflection point,” via TechCrunch.

-Television is becoming increasingly significant to Facebook and Twitter as they vie to cash in on second-screening, reports The New York Times.

-And Salon observes that the Breaking Bad finale shows that even young cord-cutters are tuning in to big TV experiences in real time.

-A Cisco report on the Internet of Things forecasts a nearly nine-fold increase in connected devices by 2020, according to ReadWrite.

-The Business of Fashion reports that China’s ecommerce giants provide a platform for fashion entrepreneurs.

-NPR takes a look at how demographics and economics are affecting China’s elderly population.

-The Economist reports on the health of the Vietnamese economy.

-A new study reveals that more middle-class Americans are going outside mainstream banking, using fringe services like payday loans, reports Time.

-Though Americans have become more likely to buy brands linked to environmental or social causes, they’re skeptical such purchases make much impact, via WARC.

-The Economist checks in on London’s new startup cluster, Tech City.

-A Pew study on Jews in America finds that secularism is on the rise, in line with the wider population, via the Los Angeles Times.

-A new report investigates what Millennials are seeking most from religion, reports USA Today.

-Boomers taking their grandchildren on vacation represent a growth area for travel, reports The Wall Street Journal.

-The FT takes a look at the Paleo diet craze and some of the businesses profiting from it.

-Pumpkin-flavored food is proliferating in the U.S., reports Nielsen.

-More Americans are indulging in dessert, not only after meals, reports USA Today.

-Gluten-free is moving to the cosmetics category, reports the Daily Mail.

-The CEO of Auctionata writes in All Things D about the advent of “art tech,” or businesses that are leverage technology to enable art purchasing.

-The Business of Fashion takes a look at how European ecommerce players are trying to reduce returns with better sizing technology.

-Wearable tech will eventually move beyond accessories as tech gets woven into clothing, says Jawbone’s CEO, via Co.Design.

-Smartphones and tablets are becoming key aids for the blind or visually impaired, reports The New York Times.

-The “iPosture” employed by people immersed in mobile devices is causing an uptick in back pain, per the New York Daily News.

-With some couples putting off marriage indefinitely, Slate reports that “in many parts of America, fiancé has become a permanent relationship status.”

-Newsweek takes a look at what might be next for the gay-rights movement after marriage is legalized.

-The FT reports that employers like Deloitte, GE and even the U.S. Army are using psychology practices to help workers become more resilient.

-The Wall Street Journal reports that stamp collecting is seeing a revival, thanks to wealthy Chinese collectors who view stamps as a serious investment.

-As vinyl records continue to gain popularity, brands are taking note, reports Ad Age.

-USA Today spotlights a spate of new gross-out toys that fart, burp and the like.

-Ultimate, the professional sport of Frisbee, is becoming more established and more lucrative, reports The Economist.

-Private jets are getting a bit more affordable, reports USA Today.

-Aiming to combat the bad reputation of Chinese tourists, China’s tourist authority has issued guidelines for travelers, according to The Wall Street Journal. 

-A new spate of fitness programs and pet spas cater to overweight dogs, reports The New York Times.

-Vanity Fair spotlights “The New Establishment: 2013.”

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