posts tagged ‘Non-Commitment Culture

-The Economist takes a look at how IBM and other tech firms are turning their attention to Africa. -Fast Company releases its “World’s 50 Most Innovative Companies” list. -A New York Times writer examines the rise of mass connoisseurship, with Americans now taking a highly discriminating approach to everything from cupcakes to cars. -In the […]

Vodafone’s new Red Hot plan lets U.K. customers rent rather than buy their mobile phone and trade it in annually. Participants choose among several high-end phones, pay a monthly fee (covering calls and texts, 2GB of data and insurance), then trade in the phone after a year. This ties into our trend Non-Commitment Culture (consumers […]

A year ago we wrote about the curated subscription companies popping up, an e-commerce model that fit with three of our 10 Trends for 2011: Non-Commitment Culture, Hyper-Personalization and the Urgency Economy. These monthly services were focused around women’s fashion and beauty, (e.g., ShoeDazzle, JewelMint, Birchbox), but we expected that the idea would quickly expand […]

-The AP examines the “outsize role” Twitter is expected to play in this year’s U.S. presidential election. -The Economist looks at why Google may be the “single biggest private-sector influence on Africa.” -In a book excerpt, author Daniel Gross examines the idea that “Americans are getting used to the idea of renting the good life,” […]

Old-fashioned monthly subscription services—think Meat of the Month’s modern makeover—are on the upswing, as The New York Times recently noted. Subscribers to New York-based startup Birchbox, for example, fill out online beauty profiles, then pay $10 a month to receive a “birch box” filled with suitable sample-size makeup and skin care products; customers can buy full-size […]

One of our “10 Trends for 2011” is the emergence of a post-recession Non-Commitment Culture. Now more than ever, consumers are reluctant to commit to discretionary or big-ticket purchases. Flexibility is the way to a customer’s heart—or wallet. Verizon FiOS is capitalizing on this trend with its contract-free plan. This offer allows Verizon customers to […]

Today there’s a seemingly insatiable desire for experiences that afford the opportunity for a real-time social media broadcast that communicates to the social graph just how cutting-edge we are. Be it a sample sale, an exclusive concert or a restaurant opening, part of the enjoyment of these experiences is to create some envy in others. Conceptually coined […]

The idea of ownership is gradually becoming less desirable and, for things like homes and cars, more out of reach. “We’ve reached the limits of what George W. Bush used to call the ‘ownership society,’” writes professor Richard Florida, author of The Great Reset: How New Ways of Living and Working Drive Post-Crash Prosperity. We’re shifting […]

As a companion to our 88-page trends forecast for the year ahead, we’ve created a 2-minute teaser video that gives a quick rundown of our 10 trends. Special thanks to The Nursery, which made this video come to life. Credits Produced and directed by Kerri Doherty and Sean Stewart Animated by Josh Burggraf and Will […]

Today we released our sixth annual year-end forecast of key trends that will shape or significantly impact consumer behavior in the year ahead. An overriding theme in our 2011 report: technology, which is driving many of our trends and at the center of others. As devices become deeply ingrained in people’s lives, we’re seeing technology […]


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Things to Watch

  • Tindergram
    April 17, 2015 | 11:03 am

    Tinder Instagram

    Swiping just got more interesting—with its latest update, Tinder lets users browse the Instagram feeds of their potential matches. The pairing (which, Adweek notes, seemed inevitable) offers “a sort of social diary, co-written by your friends and family” to help people better stalk their dates.

    Continue reading “Tindergram” »

  • Everlane’s Transparent City series
    April 8, 2015 | 2:33 pm

    Everlane LA

    “We call it Radical Transparency,” says e-tail startup Everlane. The company, known for its luxe basics, was built on the principle of disclosing production costs and keeping markups as low as possible. Now, Everlane has launched the Transparent City tour, a first-of-its-kind look at the inner workings of like-minded local companies. The kickoff event in LA brought guests behind the scenes with local bloggers, designers and chefs to learn about their creative inspiration. And, perhaps the culmination of the week — Everlane invited a select few on a tour of their factory, sharing the garment construction process from start to finish. The tour had a 300-person waitlist.

    Continue reading “Everlane’s Transparent City series” »

  • Crossing ‘the digital divide’
    March 19, 2015 | 4:24 pm

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    In a piece on an 82-year-old going online for the first time, The Washington Post called attention to a rising issue—the divide between those who use the Internet and those who don’t (13% in the U.S., and 41% among senior citizens).

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  • Incremental saving and giving
    March 11, 2015 | 1:51 pm

    Call it progress or just laziness—apps are popping up that harness our small change and put it to better use. Acorns, dubbed “the Tinder of investing,” links to a user’s debit or credit card and rounds up to the nearest dollar on every purchase. The app then takes that spare change and invests it in a portfolio of the user’s choice—portfolios range from low to high risk (and reward). Or users can opt to let Acorns choose for them based on their age, goals, income and other factors. Meanwhile, apps like Qapital and Digit facilitate regular small transfers from checking to savings, and banks themselves are getting on the incremental savings bandwagon. (See: Bank of America’s Keep the Change and Wells Fargo’s Way2Save.)

    Continue reading “Incremental saving and giving” »

  • Augmenting sleep
    March 9, 2015 | 12:02 pm

    Sense orb

    Digital platforms are already integrated into our every waking minute—now they’re moving into our sleep. A spate of apps and devices aim to aid and facilitate better sleep, from ambient lamps to a lucid dreaming sleep mask to an app that wakes you up with a phone call from a stranger.

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  • The sharing economy grows up
    March 3, 2015 | 3:30 pm

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    Hotel giant Starwood has bought in to the sharing economy. The group, which owns W Hotels, St. Regis and Sheraton, has announced a partnership with car service Uber in which every dollar spent by a guest on an Uber car earns points toward free rooms and other perks.

    Continue reading “The sharing economy grows up” »

  • Digital immersive exercise
    February 25, 2015 | 4:04 pm

    immersive-fitness-the-trip

    Equinox’s new revved-up cycle class speaks to a growing exercise trend—digital immersion. This month the gym brand unveiled Pursuit, an immersive cycling concept, to limited U.S. gyms. Equinox describes the program as “an immersive studio cycling experience that uses groundbreaking gaming and data visualization to drive competition and inspire peak performance.”

    Continue reading “Digital immersive exercise” »

  • Science fare
    February 20, 2015 | 2:07 pm

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    The worlds of science, gastronomy and art are continuing to cross-pollinate—from edible conceptual art to molecular gastronomy “lab cafés” to synesthetic dining events. Café ArtScience in Cambridge, Mass., is a recent example. Opened late last year by David Edwards, a Harvard engineering professor, the café serves whiskey “fogs” through a special carafe that turns the liquor into vapor (which means consumers don’t take in any of the calories and feel none of the intoxicating effects).

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  • Aman’s authentic-luxe travel
    February 11, 2015 | 1:06 pm

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    As travelers continue to seek out authentic and unique experiences, hospitality brands keep raising the bar on hyper-localized offerings and exceptional access. Aman, for instance, is introducing a phinisi-style sailing ship in Indonesia, marrying the brand’s ultra-luxe sensibility with regional tradition. With an outdoor lounge and bar, the option to travel by motor, and air-conditioned cabins, the ship brings every modern comfort to an age-old means of navigating the Indonesian archipelago. Another Aman property, meanwhile, offers a dip into paleontology: Guests at Amangiri in southern Utah can join an official dig at the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, working alongside fossil experts for a half-day. The cost of getting one’s hands dirty starts at $600. (Resulting Instagram images: priceless.) —Marian Berelowitz

    Image credit: Aman

  • Adidas’ ‘virtual line’
    February 5, 2015 | 6:55 pm

    Adidas

    Adidas’ new Confirmed app cleverly harnesses the fervor of collectors who normally line up for limited-edition shoes, moving fans onto a mobile platform. App users create an account, then get push notifications when hot new releases are on the way. Interested buyers in a given metro area—only New York City at launch—indicate their size and, if approved, receive details on where and when to pick up the shoes. An Adidas exec calls it a “virtual line.” In addition to collecting data on these super-fans, the app lets Adidas control which influencers get various styles, drives traffic to selected stores, builds additional buzz and cuts out secondary-market sellers armed with bots that secure advance orders. —Marian Berelowitz

    Image credit: Bloomberg

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