Theater fans are invited to follow firsthand how a play is produced, directed and staged.

With the exception of the ongoing and very public saga of Spider-Man, the inner workings of the theater world are opaque to most. But the New York Theatre Workshop is pulling back the curtain, so to speak, by inviting theater fans to follow firsthand how a play is produced, directed and staged—an interesting example of what we termed Unwrapping the Process, one of our Things to Watch in 2012.

Each season, the NYTW says it will designate one production as a “case study,” granting “unprecedented access to the artists involved in the creation of a new work as it is happening.” Over the course of eight weekly sessions led by the theater’s artistic director, participants will have conversations with the work’s playwrights, designers and director, and discuss financing, casting and the rehearsal process. They can chart the play’s progress by viewing early rehearsals, attending a preview performance and, finally, returning for the opening night; the total cost is $350. The first so-called Casebook begins in March with the new play Food and Fadwa.