Global poverty is declining, second breakfasts, "the end of online privacy"

-Global poverty is declining significantly, especially among the poorest of the poor, and The Economist provides some stats.

-Reporting on the mobile industry from the annual Mobile World Congress, CNN, USA Today and eWeek spotlight key themes and highlights. CNN also looks at “the brave new world of mHealth” (one of our 100 Things to Watch in 2011), while The New York Times outlines how PCs are getting more phonelike.

-As the privacy debate heats up, The Guardian asks if we’ve reached “the end of online privacy.” And NPR spotlights “new ways to think about online privacy” from the TED conference.

-Opinions are split as to whether Millennials’ always-connected lifestyle will prove a boost or a bane over the next decade, according to a study by the Pew Internet and American Life Project.

-With consumers growing more and more impatient when navigating the Web, Google and others “are on a new quest for speed,” reports The New York Times.

-As social media use at work spikes, employers face new IT security issues, reports USA Today.

The Wall Street Journal notes an upcoming shift in Silicon Valley IPOs, from high-profile consumer Internet companies to enterprise technology firms.

-A new study looks at how social media is changing the way we eat, reports Mashable.

-Americans are eating a “second breakfast,” reports the Associated Press, with morning calories consumed in stages rather than one sizable meal.

-A doctor’s op-ed in Time asks whether America’s fight against childhood obesity is actually creating eating disorders.

-The Pew Research Center finds that among Americans with mobiles, a majority now own smartphones.

Reuters reports that Silicon Valley is seeing ever-younger entrepreneurs—with some chief executives still in their teens.

-Target and Walmart are among the retailers working together to develop mobile payment options, reports The Wall Street Journal.

-The NPD Group examines the rise of “showrooming” (researching in-store, then buying online).

-Retail needs a reboot to survive, says a GigaOm columnist, who outlines a few ways in which brick-and-mortar operators can evolve.

The Economist examines “m-campaigning,” the rise of mobile messaging among political candidates.

The Next Web spotlights innovations that provide a glimpse into the future of online banking.

Co.Exist spotlights the FutureScapes project, which theorizes how a warming planet will affect technology development.

-American airports are becoming “classy shopping complexes,” reports the Los Angeles Times.

-Airlines are coming up with ever more ideas for ways to produce more income, with some taking inspiration from the finance world, according to The New York Times.

The Wall Street Journal looks at the sharp rise in budget airlines operating flights across Asia.

-French expats are flocking to Hong Kong, Singapore and elsewhere in Asia as more luxury brands move into Asian markets, says The New York Times.

The Economist sees “big opportunities and big problems” for companies looking to move into a changing Myanmar and reports on the country’s “digital spring.”

The New York Times takes a look at the spate of virtual-closet websites and how the gap between browsing and buying might be bridged.

-Fashion is incorporating electronics to give garments an extra glow, reports The New York Times.

Bloomberg Businessweek says the “brogrammer” is the new tech geek.