"Brave thinkers," adultifying Halloween, gender equality

The Atlantic releases its list of the year’s “brave thinkers,” people who are “risking their reputations, fortunes, and lives in pursuit of big ideas.”

Foreign Policy examines whether the BRIC nations are “really the future of the global economy.”

-Gender equality has advanced in education and health care, but significant gaps remain when it comes to jobs and wages, according to a World Economic Forum report.

-Research suggests the “infidelity gender gap” may be closing in the U.S., with women becoming nearly as unfaithful as men, reports The Wall Street Journal.

Young Britons are more responsible and less rebellious than the youth of preceding generations, reports The Economist.

While all Americans are growing more concerned about their ability to retire, Gen X is particularly anxious, according to a Pew Research Center study.

-A new study finds the shaky economy is leaving American workers stressed out and burned out by their jobs, reports USA Today.

The New York Times examines how tech heavyweights like Google and Intel are scrambling to adjust to a more mobile-centric world.

-GigaOM looks at how businesses like AirBnb, Coursera and Uber are driving the “Rise of the Disruption Economy.”

The Economist spotlights “the rise of no-name designers”: direct-to-consumer online businesses that offer upscale goods for less.

-Brian Solis examines “The Erosion of Privacy and the Rise of Publicness…and why it’s a good thing.”

-An Ad Age columnist predicts what the TV and video advertising landscape will look like in 2020.

-An Economist special report on technology and geography examines the impact of the physical realm on the digital one, including a look at how “the Internet is going local” and how cities are leveraging geolocation data.

The New York Times spotlights a crop of London-based startups seeking to upend traditional banking.

-“Are Wearable Gadgets the Next Tech Revolution?” asks Co.Design.

Wired looks at just how vulnerable smartphones are to mobile malware.

-A comScore study in the U.S. finds that “tablets are fundamentally redefining how people consume news and information.”

-A report on social commerce from Eventbrite finds that more consumers are sharing via social media and that “dollars per share” are spiking.

-More brands are mining the social media landscape for campaign inspiration, according to The Wall Street Journal.

GigaOM examines the evolution of email and some startups looking to improve the experience.

-A new Pew study examines Americans’ use of e-books and other reading trends.

-Libraries aren’t dead yet: A new survey finds that young adults still visit the institutions, reports The New York Times.

-“Chinese Fiction Is Hot,” declares Bloomberg Businessweek, noting that Nobel Prizewinner Mo Yan is among a group of Chinese writers gaining international notice.

USA Today says Halloween is getting increasingly adultified in America.

-Hollywood is becoming more reliant on international audiences, especially those in China and Russia, reports Foreign Policy.

USA Today reports that airports are offering a slew of new amenities designed to help relieve travelers’ stress.

Time releases its annual list of the top blogs of the year.

Fast Company interviews our own Ann Mack about our latest trend report, “Health and Happiness: Hand in Hand.” For more on the report, click here.