China prefers "Made in the USA," desk beds, business comes to Myanmar

-A Boston Consulting Group study finds that Chinese consumers regard “Made in the USA” as better quality and will pay a premium for it. And a BCG report forecasts that the number of affluent consumers in China will more than double by 2020.

-The latest World Energy Outlook report finds that demand from Asia is spiking and that the U.S. is on track to become a net exporter of energy, according to The Economist.

-Accenture’s Luxury Shopping Survey finds that while half of American consumers plan on buying luxury in the near future, their choices will be restrained, per The Los Angeles Times.

The Wall Street Journal reports that, although doing business there presents serious challenges, companies are establishing footholds in Myanmar.

Ad Age looks at food trends in America and how marketers are adapting to new consumer demands for “fast, fresh, flavorful.”

The Wall Street Journal spotlights the rise of beer sommeliers, one of our 100 Things to Watch in 2011.

The Economist looks at the rise of Brazilian investment in Africa.

Quartz magazine examines how India’s Aakash tablet could “blindside PC makers, educate billions and transform computing as we know it.”

The Economist looks at the impending war between the credit industry’s big players as they move toward virtual wallets.

-More companies are actively supporting gay rights as they work to retain top talent, according to a study outlined by The Wall Street Journal.

The New York Times spotlights some conflicting research on consumers’ music spending and listening habits.

The Verge takes a look at the advent of “over the top” TV services, arguing that “the new war for TV is just beginning.”

-A Guardian columnist spotlights some of the ways in which the retail industry is changing.

The Wall Street Journal reports that Black Friday is increasingly moving online for retailers and consumers.

The New York Times reports that major U.S. retailers are starting to take on the role of banks, selling a range of financial products.

-A Fast Company columnist argues that the apparel industry is ripe for innovation.

-In a New York Times op-ed, author David Bornstein chronicles the rise of the social entrepreneur.

The Economist looks at how tobacco companies are dealing with strict packaging regulation.

The New York Times looks at how algorithmic bidding systems that target individual consumers online are hurting traditional Web publishers.

-New research shows that men and women are becoming more likely to agree on how to share working and parenting responsibilities, as reported in Inc.

-The bed is becoming the second desk, reports The Wall Street Journal, as people increasingly bring their work (and tech devices) to the bedroom.

-A new report finds that America is hosting more international students than ever, especially Chinese students, reports USA Today.

-Among China’s super-wealthy, flying is seen as the new hobby of choice, but little airspace is open to civilians, according to Reuters.

-Nick Bilton makes a case for casting ballots by smartphone in The New York Times.

-A Time columnist explores the difference between multitasking and “Digital-Device-Distraction Syndrome.”

Adweek looks at how the U.S. Federal Trade Commission plans to crack down on deceptive health claims in advertising.

The Wall Street Journal reports that “P.S.” is dying out in an age of digital communications.

-“GIF” edges out “YOLO” to become the Oxford American Dictionaries’ Word of the Year.