Telepresence robots, hacking sewers, teens ditch Facebook

-The Economist spotlights peer-to-peer services (one of our 10 Trends for 2013) in its Technology Quarterly, along with the rise of telepresence robots and Ultra HD television.

-At this year’s SXSW Interactive, the spotlight is shifting from software to devices, reports The New York Times.

The Wall Street Journal examines how the app industry is maturing into a $25 billion business. It also reports that China is becoming “the next battleground” for app makers and examines the “disposable culture” that Snapchat represents.

The Verge explores why teens may be ditching Facebook for social media services like Tumblr and Instagram.

USA Today takes a look at how mobile devices are killing the traditional workday and changing business practices.

The New York Times examines how Internet companies like Netflix and Amazon are challenging traditional TV networks.

-With technology now “fundamental to competitive advantage in the consumer-packaged-goods industry,” McKinsey Quarterly spotlights trends that are transforming the CIO role.

-Singapore has become “the world’s newest Monaco,” says The Wall Street Journal.

The New York Times reports on Hungary’s attempt to change eating habits and raise revenue by taxing salty and sugary foods.

Businessweek examines “What Africa Can Teach Us About the Future of Banking.”

-While young Americans are accruing more student debt than ever, they’re getting more wary of borrowing in general, explains The Wall Street Journal.

The Guardian reports that as Bitcoin gains ground, the alternative currency is “part of a gradual, technological shift in the way we think about money.”

The Economist takes a look at China’s booming luxury car market.

-A New York Times op-ed spotlights the feminization of farming in developing regions as more men migrate to cities for jobs.

The Wall Street Journal looks at how employers are using tracking sensors and harnessing Big Data to fine-tune the workplace.

-The rise of the Internet of Things means that everything from sewers to street lights has become hackable, as NPR reports.

The Wall Street Journal looks at how online retailers are setting up delivery networks as e-commerce explodes in China.

The New York Times reports on the phenomenon of Internet marriages.

-The stylus is making a comeback, reports The Australian.

-Nail art is “the new unapologetic emblem of femininity,” reports The Globe and Mail (which quotes our own Ann Mack).

Travel Weekly reports that more hotels are embracing local sourcing.

-A new survey on stress and the workplace finds that Americans are less satisfied with their jobs and work-life balance than in 2012, per The Wall Street Journal.

Bloomberg Businessweek takes a look at the gender gap in American education as women pull further ahead of men.

-Companies marketing LED bulbs are waiting for customers to embrace the new technology, as The Wall Street Journal reports.

-The brouhaha over horse meat in Europe is spurring sales of the product in some countries, The Wall Street Journal reports.

NPR ponders who’s liable when a driverless car crashes.