Feminists who stay home, ‘mobile blinders,' China's e-tail revolution

-With today’s tots immersed in touch-screen devices, Atlantic correspondent Hanna Rosin asks what it means for childhood development.

New York looks at “the retro wife”: a new breed of feminist who chooses to stay at home.

-A McKinsey report covers China’s e-tail revolution in depth.

– A Wired cover story examines “the new rules of the hyper-social, data-driven, actor-friendly, super-seductive platinum age of television.”

Fast Company reports on the forward-thinking Hollywood players who are embracing digital in a bid to avoid the fate of the music industry.

MIT Technology Review considers the challenges of bringing MOOCs to developing-world learners.

-As many more Indians get connected to the Internet over the next few years, McKinsey Quarterly explores the potential effect on the country’s GDP.

Campaign Asia looks at how mobile devices are taking a chunk out of the traditional toy market in Asia.

-With impulse purchases at checkout down now that shoppers are immersed in their phones, Bloomberg looks at how brands from Hearst to Hershey are responding to the “mobile blinders” phenomenon.

-MIT Technology Review’s Business Report examines “Making Money in Mobile,” positing that “the real change in the technology business is only just beginning.”

The Economist reports on “mixing bricks with clicks”—online retailers that are now opening physical stores.

Brand Channel looks at how mobile payments are starting to change retail.

-Online shopping habits are shifting from PC to mobile in Asia Pacific, with developing nations leading the way, according to a MasterCard study featured in Campaign Asia.

USA Today looks at how companies of all sizes are using 3D prototyping to push innovation.

-With a gun control debate raging in the U.S., NPR asks whether smart tech can help curb gun violence.

-With drones likely to become ubiquitous, The New York Times examines some of the potential implications and problems.

Macworld U.K. surveys how far wearable technology has come.

-Now that flat screens have killed off demand for recycled tubes from old monitors and TVs, they’re accumulating into a “glass tsunami” that’s a growing problem, reports The New York Times.

The Economist examines the tricky issue of electronic lending for public libraries.

Wired examines how book publishers are scrambling to adapt to the digital age.

The Guardian reports on Russian women’s rights group Femen and the “rise of the naked female warriors.”

The AP suggests kids are migrating from Facebook to other social options like Instagram and Snapchat.

The Wall Street Journal looks at the rise of the single twentysomething mom in the U.S.

-As more young women in Afghanistan and Pakistan embrace education and marry later, The Atlantic looks at what it takes to be an open-minded father in the region.

NPR looks at how health insurers are starting to motivate customers to buy healthier foods.

-With a shortage of primary care physicians in the U.S., NPR looks at the rise of group appointments.

The New York Times takes a look at how hotel check-ins are becoming faster or more personalized.

-The sale of Lonely Planet prompts Today and The Guardian to question whether the guidebook as we know it is dead.

ArtInfo outlines some trends shaping the art market.

NPR reports on why craft brews are chipping away at bigger brands’ share of the market.