Human experience is advertising's new medium, the end of privacy, tech startups in the Arab world

Find our roundups collected in magazine form on Flipboard, the iOS and Android app; download the app to view this week’s edition here: http://flip.it/GJ1IO.

Due to Independence Day office closures, this roundup covers the past two weeks.

-Writing in Harvard Business Review, Jeffrey F. Rayport argues that with traditional marketing methods increasingly ineffective, human experience is advertising’s new medium.

-In a Wall Street Journal essay, Francis Fukuyama attributes today’s political turmoil to unmet expectations among newly prosperous and educated citizens.

-After more than two years of war and turmoil, an Economist special report asks whether the Arab Spring has been a failure.

-The New York TimesNick Bilton explores how images are starting to form a new type of language in the digital realm.

-Privacy has “jumped the shark,” says New York’s Frank Rich, arguing that today’s America “prefers to be out there, prizing networking, exhibitionism, and fame more than privacy, introspection, and solitude.”

-A TechCrunch writer argues that the biggest threat to privacy is not online but in the physical world.

The New York Times spotlights the rise of “countersurveillance fashion.”

GigaOM makes a case for a sliding scale of privacy online.

The Economist takes a look at the expansion of tech startups around the Arab world.

The New York Times reports on a study that explores why Asian Internet companies aren’t succeeding on a global scale.

-With China now the biggest smartphone market, homegrown smartphone brands are challenging Apple and Samsung, reports The New York Times.

The Atlantic discusses China’s growing problem of caring for its elderly.

-Americans are living longer but not healthier, according to The Wall Street Journal.

The Wall Street Journal reports on the expansion of health clinics in American workplaces.

-The AP looks at the American trend toward hiring freelancers, consultants or contract workers rather than full-time employees.

Pew studies the rise of single fathers in the U.S. The Atlantic asks what this trend means for fatherhood. (Also see our June report, “The State of Men.”)

-More evidence of our Marriage Optional trend: Projections show that by 2016, a majority of British children will be born to unwed mothers, per The Telegraph.

-Japan’s national mood is on the rise, as is interest in playing a larger role on the world stage, according to a Pew study.

-Americans are feeling less inclined to engage in international issues, according to a study from Pew.

-A Nielsen global survey finds that with rising discretionary income in many growth markets, “consumption is expanding beyond the everyday basics.”

The Economist takes a look at how retailers are adapting to the threat posed by e-commerce giants.

USA Today examines why some U.S. apparel brands are leaving China and “reshoring” their manufacturing.

-More men are “finding lessons in their grandfathers’ wardrobes,” says The Wall Street Journal. (See our “State of Men” report for more on “retrosexuals.”)

-With gender lines continuing to blur, The New York Times spotlights the popularity of suits tailor-made for women.

Bloomberg takes a look at how retailers are responding to the trend toward mother-daughter clothes shopping.

-The latest edition of “Monitoring the Future,” a survey of young Americans, looks at how the Great Recession has affected attitudes among high schoolers.

USA Today explores the long-term impact of student loan debt on Millennials’ lives.

ABC News takes a look at a new crop of Millennial-targeted media networks.

-Today’s TV shows are bringing a big-screen sensibility to the flat screen, as the Philadelphia Inquirer reports.

-A Mashable infographic spotlights how we discover and consume music today.

-With the advent of self-driving cars, cities may start looking very different, as The New York Times reports.

-As demand for automotive apps skyrockets, The New York Times looks at the rise of a high-tech culture in Detroit.

-A New York Times news analysis explores “The End of Car Culture.”

-More hotels are looking to lure locals interested in various amenities rather than an overnight stay, reports The Wall Street Journal.

Quartz magazine checks out the smartwatch market and outlines some trends.

-The watch industry is growing even as wristwatches become superfluous, as MarketWatch reports.

The New York Times reports on three high-tech glasses released this year that aren’t Google-related.

The Atlantic deconstructs the De-teching trend, the “Age of Techno Anxiety” and “the new New Naturalism.”

The Economist explores books related to Visual Fluency (one of our 10 Trends for 2010) and the “revolution” in visualizing information.

The New York Times takes a look at how food brands are catering to rising interest in Asian and Latin flavors among a more diverse American population.

Ad Age reports on trends evident at this year’s Fancy Food Show in New York.

The Economist looks at the brunch craze among Mumbai’s ultra-rich.

-Exotic berries of all shapes, colors and sizes are having their moment in the produce department, according to The Wall Street Journal.

The Economist takes a look at how changes in coffee consumption are affecting crop farmers.

-Amid fears of milk safety in China, wet nurses are becoming more popular, according to Bloomberg Businessweek.

-British consumers are choosing butter over margarine these days, reports The Guardian.

-The AP examines “marijuana’s march toward the mainstream” in the U.S.

-Europe is adopting even stricter bans on tobacco products.

-This week we launched the JWTIntelligence iPad app, which brings our trends intelligence to life for the tablet. For more information, click here.