Consumers will pay more to companies that give back, wealthy Millennials, mobile video in China

Find our roundups collected in magazine form on Flipboard, the iOS and Android app; download the app to view this week’s edition here:

-According to a Nielsen study, more global consumers are willing to pay a premium for products from companies that give back to society.

-The new “Meaningful Brands” report finds that Asia-Pacific consumers are most likely to say brands improve their quality of life, WARC reports.

Reuters explores how wealthy Millennials regard money: as a means to career freedom and an enabler of luxury experiences.

-While the British economy is growing again, a severe decline in living standards persists, reports The Economist. For more on how Britons are handling austerity, see JWT London’s Q2 Austerity Index report.

-Driven partly by demand from emerging markets, Chinese manufacturers are taking a bigger share of global branded smartphone sales, according to WARC.

-As mobile video explodes in China, Brand Channel reports that viewers are getting hooked on American shows, from Gossip Girl to Friends.

-MIT’s Technology Review takes a look at how social media is shaping (and strengthening) interpersonal relationships.

-With more people seeing marriage as optional (one of our 10 Trends for 2012), the FT explains why brands must better target the growing ranks of singletons. 

-Professional matchmakers are turning to Facebook to find clients and matches, explains The Daily Beast.

The Atlantic spotlights a couples app that gamifies relationships.   

USA Today interviews our own Ann Mack in spotlighting the rise of stress-reduction products.

Forbes reports on the advent of video messaging.

Pew reports that more than 7 in 10 online adults in America use social networks.

Forrester issues a forecast for tablet adoption over the next few years.

-A new study charts the trend toward news “snacking” on mobile devices.

Wired analyzes “Why Vine just won’t die.”

-A Forrester analyst describes the connected car of the future in All Things D.

-An NPR series on America’s changing car culture kicks off with a look at how teens’ relationship with cars has evolved since the ’60s.

Adweek takes a look at how digital media is changing the food business.

The Atlantic examines why American drinkers are losing interest in beer.

The New York Times spotlights the costly competition among airlines to design better business-class seats.

-Following media coverage on how the smart home may become our own worst enemy, Quartz outlines a new class of crime that’s on the way.

-Young Europeans are adopting mobile banking habits, according to a new study from eMarketer. 

A new study examines the persuasive power of positive online feedback.

Slate explores whether Millennials are as narcissistic as they’re reputed to be. 

-American Boomers are increasingly drawn to hip urban neighborhoods, as The Wall Street Journal reports.

-The FT examines what’s driving a baby boom in the U.K.

-A Good columnist looks at why employers should introduce play into the workplace, a theme explored in Play As a Competitive Advantage, one of our 10 Trends for 2013. 

-The street sport of parkour is moving indoors, to specialized gyms, and becoming a big business, per The New York Times.

The Wall Street Journal looks at the boom in businesses that organize races for “weekend warriors.” 

-E-cigarette smokers are becoming pervasive around New York, reports The New York Times.

The Business of Fashion investigates what’s driving the fast-rising prices of designer fashion.

-Germans are taking to traditional garb like Lederhosen, reports The Economist. 

-A Pew study on American views of radical life extension found that a majority would not be interested in living to 120 or beyond.