Mexico is an immigrant destination, designer labels in Latin America, FW/OBs

Find our roundups collected in magazine form on Flipboard, the iOS and Android app; download the app to view this week’s edition here:

-Mexico is becoming an “immigrant destination” for both executives and laborers as its economy powers ahead, reports The New York Times.

-A special report on Brazil in The Economist includes a look at how domestic brands, from Natura to Havaianas, are prospering.

-Designer labels are on the rise in Latin America, reports The FT.

Nielsen has a look at how the Great Recession has changed shopping behavior for global consumers.

-The UN’s Broadband Commission outlines mobile broadband growth in a new report and says broadband use in developing countries will soon outstrip that in wealthier countries, via The New York Times.

Ad Age reports that e-commerce is starting to negatively impact big packaged-goods brands.

-E-commerce is picking up significantly in Egypt, reports The Wall Street Journal.

-Big brands are tapping into crowdfunding to align themselves with their customers’ causes, according to Adweek.

Adweek takes a look at how responsive design affects advertisers.

-In The Telegraph, Tesco’s chief executive outlines why companies must keep pace with the radically new habits of the next generation.

-Retailers are doing more to crack down on returns and refund fraud, according to Businessweek.

-A study by WSL Strategic Retail contradicts the old notion that men don’t bother with sales and coupons, and that they don’t like to shop, via CNBC.

Bloomberg takes a look at the boom in men’s grooming products.

The Washington Post takes a look at how retailers like Brooks Brothers are leveraging Big Data.

The Guardian spotlights the rise of Nigerian videogame creators, who are winning fans with “experiences that are uniquely African.”

-Robots may supplant workers in Chinese electronics plants within five years, transforming the manufacturing industry, per The Wall Street Journal.

-In “Friends Without Benefits,” Vanity Fair examines how social networks, dating apps and Internet porn are affecting teen girls.

-A new Pew study examines “Who’s Not Online and Why” in the U.S.

The New York Times takes a look at how people are carving out smartphone-free spaces in their lives.

The New York Times’ Jenna Wortham observes that “the replay Web” exists as a counterpoint to the real-time Web.

-YouTube is trending up and Facebook trending down when it comes to British teens’ favorite websites, reports the FT.

-American teens are optimistic about their future, but their parents are pessimistic, according to a new report covered in Time.

Flavorwire argues that popular notions about Millennials are far too simplistic.

-A report from Complex Media says Millennial males rebel against mass culture but are also highly brand-conscious, via Ad Age.

The Economist takes a look at how generations are coexisting (or not) in the workplace.

-A new study of religious views among American college students finds that a “remarkable degree of indifference to religion” is on the rise.

The New York Times takes a look at why divorce is growing more common for Americans 50 and up.

-As Chinese diets change, packaged foods are on the rise, and so are health issues, as The Atlantic reports.

-A growing category of snacks made with seaweed, vegetables and other healthy foods cater to desire for “permissible indulgences,” reports The Wall Street Journal.

-Chocolate prices are on the rise as dark chocolate (which requires more cocoa beans) becomes more popular, per The Wall Street Journal.

-India, one of the fastest-growing markets for beer, is embracing brews with higher alcohol content, per Reuters.

-As we’ve noted, kids are getting into gourmet cooking, and The Wall Street Journal spotlights the rise of these junior chefs.

NPR covers the growing popularity of rooftop farms in New York City and Chicago.

USA Today takes a look at America’s spreading “pretzel mania.”

-The FT spotlights “25 Chinese to Watch” and takes a look at China’s booming “success studies” industry.

The New York Times reports that high-speed trains are transforming China, sometimes in unexpected ways.

-“100 Pop-Culture Things That Make You a Millennial,” via Vulture.

-Snazzy, attention-getting sneakers are striking a chord with today’s fashion-conscious men, reports The New York Times.

-From YouTube to Popular Science, websites are re-examining their approach to user comments, via The Guardian.

USA Today looks at how digital technology is changing travel for vacationers, for better and for worse.

-According to Census data reported on by Pew, nearly one out of every two dollars earned in the U.S. goes to a college graduate.

-With nursing home care much cheaper in Eastern Europe than Germany, Bloomberg Businessweek spotlights the “grandma export trend.”

-Whatever became of Second Life? The Verge examines the alternative world’s “second life.”

-Our latest trend report spotlights findings from a wide-ranging study of Millennials in the BRIC markets.