Brand loyalty in Africa, Millennials love the occult, moms spend more time on the phone than teens

Find our roundups collected in magazine form on Flipboard, the iOS and Android app; download the app to view this week’s edition here:

The Economist looks at how brands are building loyalty among Africa’s lower-income consumers.

McKinsey examines how American retailers “can keep up with consumers” in today’s fast-changing landscape.

-The FT reports that “Brazil has become a hotbed for some of the world’s most innovative social media businesses” in a special report on innovation and R&D in the country.

Nielsen spotlights “today’s Central European consumer.”

-A Forbes contributor outlines “What Can We Expect From the Next Decade of Marketing?”

-The occult is finding popularity among angsty Millennials, reports Newsweek.

The Guardian asks, “Why have young people in Japan stopped having sex?”

-A new Pew study of online dating finds that it’s “playing a significant role in American romance,” as The Atlantic reports.

-An FT special report looks at what it means to be gay in today’s corporate culture as more businesses embrace diversity.

-With “freshness” increasingly important to Americans, canned and preserved foods are on the decline, reports Bloomberg Businessweek.

The New York Times spotlights startups that are bringing a Silicon Valley mentality to the food industry.

-An Adweek infographic provides another look at the recent report examining Millennials as new parents.

Quartz reports on a survey showing that moms spend even more time on phones than teenagers do.

Elite Travel examines “The Modern Man” and the rise of male grooming, featuring data from our report on “The State of Men.”

Quartz checks out the new breed of “Manfluencers” in supermarkets.

Businessweek takes a look at the rise of startups that use Big Data to inform hiring practices.

-A snapshot of life in cities of the future, from Time.

The Wall Street Journal reports on how tracking technology is helping employers to monitor the routines of workers.

The New York Times takes a look at new services and apps that cater to consumers anxious about surveillance.

-“We’re in the middle of an epic battle for power in cyberspace,” reports The Atlantic, with big institutions pitted against decentralized groups.

-A new survey in the U.K. points to mobile fast becoming the first screen for many Millennials, via The Drum.

-The young tablet market “already has a premium and a budget end,” as The Economist reports.

The New York Times Jenna Wortham analyzes the selfie phenomenon and why it’s more than a mere fad.

-Cisco’s chief futurist takes a look at how today’s wearable tech might evolve, via LinkedIn.

Newsweek argues that wearable tech must become more fashionable if it’s to find real success.

With its valuation now at $3.8 billion, New York argues that “it’s time to start taking Pinterest seriously.”

Pew examines the role that Facebook now plays in disseminating news.

The New York Times takes a look at London’s rising technology hub.

-The FT considers the future of letter writing and, more broadly, mail services.

-Bikes are outselling cars in most of Europe, reports NPR.

-With electronic bikes becoming pervasive in China and Europe, The Atlantic looks at the prospects for success in the U.S.

-A Forbes contributor picks Top 10 workplace trends for 2014.

-A Forbes writer observes that Millennials seek “21st century careers with 20th century skills.”

The Next Web considers the future of gyms.

Quartz reports that Brazil’s aviation industry is driving adoption of more sustainable fuel.

-Vietnam’s airline industry is forecast to boom, reports Reuters.

-Americans are increasingly buying prescription drugs overseas to cut costs, reports The New York Times.

The New Yorker spotlights “America’s decline, in three charts.”

The Wall Street Journal reports that as neckties start disappearing from the corporate world, they’re becoming hip accessories for younger men.