Across the Muslim world, for instance, a generation of young women is turning to fashion as a way to express their individuality.

In the “everything goes” age, it may look a lot like tradition has been thrown out the window, but instead, traditions around the world are being remixed, updated and re-examined. We’ve termed this Remixing Tradition, one of our 10 Trends for 2014 and Beyond, and its effects are far-reaching. Across the Muslim world, for instance, a generation of young women is turning to fashion as a way to express their individuality, doing so in a way that embraces elements of modern Western styles while respecting their faith. For these “hijabsters,” being stylish and being devout are not mutually exclusive.

Hijabsters frequently add fashion-forward elements, such as designer shoes, belts and handbags, and mix bold colors and patterns, as they seek to redefine traditional Islamic dress, as The Guardian has reported. Two years ago, New York-based fashion designer Nailah Lymus founded the Underwraps Agency, reportedly the first global modeling agency for Muslim women. This trend has found a particular hold in Indonesia, which is poised to become the capital of an estimated $96 billion (and growing) Muslim fashion industry.

In the MENA region, JWT MENA notes in their 10 Trends for 2014 report that consumer mindsets are shifting from challenging change to creating change. The younger generation is increasingly willing to push current boundaries of acceptability, but consumers overall are still keen to preserve their cultures and traditions. In a fall 2013 survey conducted by JWT MENA in six countries (Egypt, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, UAE and Lebanon), 85 percent of adults agree it’s important to hold on to family traditions, and 78 percent say that wearing revealing clothing is considered taboo in their society. Remixing Tradition thus allows young people to express themselves individually while continuing to observe tradition. Brands can follow a similar route, helping to usher in change while also respecting time-honored mores.

Image Credit: The Underwraps Agency