This report maps out gaps in perception between how locals view their country and how the global population views it.

In collaboration with JWT SONAR™, today JWTIntelligence launched Personality Atlas: The World Map Redrawn, a report and interactive website that envisions a world map redrawn according to personality type. Which countries would share borders? In which hemisphere would each reside? And what can multinational marketers learn from this reimagined map, especially as they look to expand into new markets and strengthen their presence in others?

The Personality Atlas report is based on findings from a 27-market study of 6,075 adults aged 18-plus that used SONAR™, JWT’s proprietary online research tool. The study covered Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Czech Republic, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Thailand, United Kingdom and United States. Our respondents provided their perceptions of each country surveyed, including their own—we looked at overall perceptions, as well as perceptions related to people, culture, government and brands/products.

Taking it one step further, we had respondents assign personality traits to each country. We then redrew the world map (twice) based on the personality assigned to each country, creating continents out of countries with similar personalities and plotting dissimilar types in opposing hemispheres. One map showcases the personality traits assigned by the global population; the second each country’s self-ascribed attributes. These maps reveal that for the most part, global perceptions don’t align with local ones. Quite often, our attitudes toward and perceptions of a particular country are dictated by our level of familiarity with that market and the stereotypes related to it.

Whether we admit it or not, the vast majority of us organize the world according to stereotypes—standardized mental pictures that represent an opinion, prejudiced attitude or uncritical judgment. Some have argued that as the world becomes more interconnected, people will develop more informed and nuanced views on other countries and cultures. But it seems we are relying more than ever on stereotypes as shortcuts to navigate a global landscape that’s increasingly complex and information-dense.

This report (literally) maps out gaps in perception between how locals view their country and how the global population views it, offering ways multinational marketers can reconcile these gaps and handle stereotyping as they expand into new markets and strengthen their presence in others. The full report can be downloaded via personalityatlas.com.