Find our new State of Men report here for more on what brands are and should be doing to reflect the new modern family.

People are increasingly questioning long-held assumptions about who does what in the household and makes the most sacrifices. For instance, a recent survey from the moving company Mayflower found that more than 7 in 10 Millennials would support a move for the wife’s job vs. under 6 in 10 Boomers. Last week, Max Schireson, head of Silicon Valley firm MongoDB, made headlines with a blog post in which he explained his decision to downgrade to a vice chairman role so he can better focus on his three children. “Friends and colleagues often ask my wife how she balances her job and motherhood,” he wrote. “Somehow, the same people don’t ask me.”

Marketing is starting to better reflect changing gender roles in the family, as we’ve noted in the past. Brands have mostly dropped the “doofus dad” and have started creating work that celebrates rather than mocks what fathers do. For Father’s Day this year, a Dove Men + Care press release bore the headline “It’s Time to Acknowledge the Ways Dads Care” and cited a Dove finding that while three-quarters of fathers feel responsible for their child’s emotional well-being, only 20 percent see this role reflected in media; a short film shows dads wholeheartedly participating in the upbringing of their kids. Meanwhile, a Canadian campaign for Peanut Butter Cheerios (dubbed “the official cereal of dadhood”) is an ode to the modern dad. The father in a two-minute spot deftly manages the family’s four kids, proclaiming, “This, my friends—this is ‘how to dad.’” Find an unabridged version of our State of Men report here for more on what brands are and should be doing to reflect the new modern family.