3D scanners can create digital 3D models of people or objects by capturing their exact size and shape.

Made-to-measure apparel for the masses is becoming available thanks to 3D scanners, which can create digital 3D models of people or objects by capturing their exact size and shape. Finland-based Left Shoe Company—which has a flagship in L.A. and currently a pop-up in New York—and American brand Alton Lane use in-store 3D scanning for high-end men’s shoes and clothing, respectively. But while Fast Company recently referred to 3D scanning as the “future of bespoke design,” it’s becoming more than a high-tech version of custom tailoring, opening up precise body and sole customization to more consumers.

Focused on shoes, Swedish startup Volumental relies on Intel’s upcoming RealSense 3D Camera, which enables 3D scanning from mobile devices. The company’s founder tells Venturebeat they aim to make “tailored products the norm rather than a luxury,” selling the system to shoe manufacturers. Three Over Seven, based in New Zealand, is planning to use 3D foot scans for customization of its running shoes, which are made from wool, using a mobile app for sizing. They’re hoping to offer custom shoes made within 24 hours at a digital shoe factory in London, reports Gizmag.

As technology advances and prices drop, McKinsey notes, 3D scanning could eventually move into the home, “giving consumers the ability to scan themselves, upload the 3-D model, and start ordering clothing ‘tailor-made’ just for them.”

Image credit: Volumental