British women are less likely than men to have noticed the effects of the national recovery.

Austerity policies in the U.K. are set to continue for at least the next five years. But while austerity continues to affect everyone in the U.K., it appears that it is weighing on women more than on men. According to J. Walter Thompson London’s seventh quarterly Austerity Index report, women are less likely than men to have noticed the effects of the national recovery, despite employing more money-saving tactics and reporting spending less on necessities each week. Only 28 percent of women feel the British economy is in a recovery, versus 41 percent of men.

Austerity Index Q3 2014

Women are also more likely to report having to restrict spending and experiencing difficulty saving. Some 77 percent of women say they have had to make a financial sacrifice to make ends meet, compared to 69 percent of men. And 46 percent of women vs. 38 percent of men say they have less than £50 in their bank accounts at the end of each month. No wonder 1 in 4 British women feel “weary” about their financial situations, compared to fewer than 1 in 5 males.

The Austerity Index details how companies may help ease the economic burdens faced by women in the U.K.; visit austerityindex.com for more information and to download the latest report.