In a global survey, US men were more likely than women to say they’d scale back their careers for the sake of family.

A recent report from EY and Harris Interactive has found that the pendulum may be swinging the other way for working parents. In a global survey including 1,208 US adults, US men were more likely than women to say they’d scale back their careers for the sake of family. Sixty-seven percent of men have changed jobs or said they would be willing to do so to better balance family life, versus 57% of women. And 36% of men would take a pay cut for the same reason, compared with 33% of women.

DaddyTrack

Our 2013 State of Men report noted this rising role of men in family life—“The household is becoming more gender-neutral as men both embrace a more active role and get pushed into it out of necessity…Men aren’t yet doing an equal share, but they’re just as concerned as women about achieving a work-life balance.”

The EY report implies that men might be even more concerned about work-life balance than women, but Karyn Twaronite, EY’s diversity and inclusiveness officer, suggests an alternative: men feel that putting family first will not derail their long-term career plans. “They’d face fewer headwinds,” she told The Huffington Post.

As women have risen in the workplace, so too has the “mommy track,” the idea that women who have children are often steered into lower-status jobs than their childless counterparts. The EY survey results suggest that men might be consciously choosing to make similar career sacrifices—but whether these decisions ultimately play out differently for men is a topic for further research.

Image credit: Huffington Post