Stretch marks, All Day Adidas, Amazon Prime.

–A storefront in Chinatown has been transformed into a ghost store to promote the movie “A Ghost Story,” an experience Adweek calls “unexpectedly profound.”

–”What if the best way to slice is no longer by geography, but by age?” asks TechCrunch, noting the global similarities between Chinese and American millennials.

–Two campaigns from Target and ASOS feature women with stretch marks, and women on social media are “thrilled” with the non-airbrushed approach. Via Quartz.

–”What could we do to help people stay engaged with a healthy routine?” Fast Company goes inside the launch of All Day, the new lifestyle app from Adidas.

–New estimates show that Amazon Prime may become more popular than cable TV by as early as next year. Via Recode.

–Media companies are incresingly reliant on a new technology giant for revenue, writes Women’s Wear Daily: Amazon.

–What did the creative community learn about AI at Cannes? Little Black Book rounds up the insights, with input from the Innovation Group.

–In China, you can now buy a KFC-branded smartphone. Via Ad Age.

Fast Company profiles the innovators that want to make hearing aids trendy, as Congress considers legislation that would open the market to consumer tech companies.

–An Indian media company is offering paid “menstrual leave” to its female staff, a first in a country where the topic is still “hugely taboo.” Via Mashable.

–Luxury menswear is “forecasted to grow at a faster rate than womenswear over the next three years,” driven largely by social media. Via Glossy.

–Adidas’s exclusive Glitch app is a case study in using micro-influencers. Via Digiday.