Wellness cocktails, Generation Alpha, museum boutiques.

–In a step towards inclusion, Tommy Hilfiger is launching a line of adaptive clothing for people with disabilities, with magnetic and velcro closures that make clothing easier to wear. Via Dazed.

–Amazon is opening a pop-up bar in Tokyo to promote liquors sold on its local website. Via Engadget.

–The next ‘next generation’: Wired Consulting and Hotwire explore the impact of technology on Generation Alpha, the toddler-aged children of millennials.

–What does wellness look like in the cocktail industry? Punch explores how brands are evolving as sobriety and healthy living become more popular.

–The Wall Street Journal explores how museum fashion exhibitions are doubling up as boutiques, selling limited-edition clothing in their gift shops.

–Nielsen is the first third-party company to track Netflix viewership data, providing the public’s first look into its streaming analytics, reports TechCrunch.

–The Chinese government is building the world’s most powerful facial recognition system, which aims to recognize any citizen within three seconds. Via South China Morning Post.

Fast Company profiles Amareta, a “hormonal cycle-based beauty wellness” brand offering products tailored to menstrual and pregnancy cycles.

–In an effort to make feminine care advertising more realistic, Bodyform has released the first advertisement to show red blood, rather than blue liquid, on a sanitary towel. Via The Independent.

–As consumers become savvier about the drugs they buy, they are favoring lower costs over name brands. Via The Wall Street Journal.

–Is eBay still relevant? Racked investigates its mission to catch up with the competition.

–Retail is now Venmo-friendly, with over 2 million US online retailers accepting Venmo payments through a PayPal account. Via Engadget.

–General Motors is the first company to test self-driving cars in New York. Via The Verge.