Waithood, AI anchors, smart cities.

–Artist Tabitha Nikolai creates immersive virtual worlds that “explore trans identity and social isolation,” writes i-D.

The New York Times examines millennials’ obsession with houseplants and the rise of the plant influencer.

Quartz explores “waithood,” the rising global phenomenon that sees millennials choosing to stay single into their thirties.

–A wave of new virtual personalities are hitting the screens: BBC announces that an AI anchor will be reporting the news in China and Dazed introduces Dadeko, a virtual beauty influencer with her own range of snapchat filters for futuristic makeup looks.

–Moscow has plans for a new smart neighborhood integrating innovative technology and renewable energy, Dezeen shares.

–French publisher L’Officiel is launching virtual currency and a blockchain platform, reimbursing users with “Taste Tokens” in exchange for data on content engagement, explains WWD.

–TripAdvisor is moving beyond travel planning into travel inspiration with their recent redesign, which offers a social media-esque feed with posts from publications, friends and celebrities. Via Skift.

–Jean Paul Gaultier joins the fur-free bandwagon as the latest luxury designer to ban fur from his collections, reports The Independent.

–Self-driving cars have officially arrived – Waymo plans to launch a driverless car service that will hit the streets next month in Phoenix, Arizona, announces Bloomberg.

–Rimmel is addressing beauty cyberbullying with their new campaign #IWILLNOTBEDELETED after finding that one in four women have been the victim of cyberbullying, says The Drum.

–London supermarket Budgens now offers more than 1,700 plastic-free products in response to consumers’ growing demand for sustainable options. Via The Independent.

–Financial Times’ Hidden Cities is turning Google home into your next travel guide – users can ask the voice assistant to take them to ‘changing Berlin,’ ‘art’ or ‘clubs,’ explains Financial Times.

–Nike opened a new flagship in NYC integrates digital touchpoints like grab-and-go buying,  customization studios and a “Speed Shop” for a frictionless retail experience, describes Fast Company.