Psychotic opera, work-out therapy, flying cars.

–Seed, an installation at IDS Toronto, navigates our relationship with food, taking visitors on “a journey narrated by a seed” that engages all five senses, writes Dezeen.

–American Eagle has tapped into gen Z’s social media savvy and entrepreneurial spirit, giving gen Z shoppers full creative control of its newest campaign, Adweek reveals.

The New Yorker describes how contemporary composers are using opera to address modern social issues.

–A pilates studio in London is merging exercise and design for a new kind of therapy,  Wallpaper reports.

–Boeing is working to reshape the future of urban transportation with its flying car, which completed its first test ride this week. Via Bloomberg.

The Guardian explores how the look and feel of marketing is adapting, shifting to new platforms and formats in an attempt to better engage consumers.

–The Pill Club now delivers birth control to homes anywhere in the United States, marking a significant milestone in contraceptive accessibility, announces Well + Good.

–Net-a-porter is expanding into the kids category with a new line of luxury kidswear, reveals Glossy.

Bloomberg describes “the epitome of no-frills luxury,” which sees high-paying travelers opting for experience over amenities. For more on the future of luxury travel, see ‘Wanderluxe’ (trend #72) in The Future 100: 2019.

BBC explores how diet and eating habits are changing, including a general reduction in sugar intake.

The New York Times describes how private clubs are making a comeback among travelers seeking “culture, history and a sense of belonging.”

The Business of Fashion examines the long-term ramifications of Dolce & Gabbana’s offensive comments about Chinese consumers.